Conjugate Latvian Verbs

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Having issues with Verbs in Latvian? būt, iet, varēt, darīt? I know I have. Well here is a nifty website that helps conjugate verbs for anyone who’s planning to study or is studying Latvian. The language is extremely different from the Romance language tree but that shouldn’t discourage you. I had fun learning Latvian earlier this year with my friend Moses Mccormick (who runs the FLR RoadRunning Language Camp website). I also like their notfication of their conjugation tool not being “Perfect”

“we know we risk being imprecise. We don’t care.”

Link: http://cooljugator.com/lv/

The Polyglot Project – Be a part of it!

A YouTube friend syzygycc started a great concept for any language enthusiasts and just about anyone who has some type of language experiences. Everyone can participate in this project. This project is about sharing the stories, the methods, and the experiences we language learners have. This is going to be a major book with wealth amounts of information and I encourage anyone who are addicts of foreign languages to join in. IT’S FREE! Just head over to these links posted and be sure to watch syzygycc video on The Polyglot Project for concepts, ideas and more information.

Videos:

  1. The Polyglot Project
  2. Polyglot Project (Claude)
  3. Draft – Polyglot Project

At Large With The Tagalog Language

As I can remember, I started dabbling with Tagalog (language of the Philippines) during July of last year 2009. Before then, I was actively studying Portuguese and still continue to look over notes that I’ve created during study hours. In the past weeks, I was inspired by a popular movie within south Eastern Europe which I watched 3 times in the target language only (for listening— absorbing the sounds) and have now started learning the basics of this language. I am glad to say that I’ve resumed my Tagalog studies while passively accepting this new Slavic language. Some of my YouTube friends may have a clue on which language it is although I won’t announce it at the moment. Credits would have to go to Pimsleur for implanting basic knowledge of Tagalog in my brain from scratch—point zero. I started with that series before going over to Teach Yourself Tagalog. Although I’ve listened to the Pimsleur Tagalog lessons, I am going to restart the series and refresh up on what I’ve learned throughout the 30 Units given for the course. I really wish that Simon & Schuster (publishers of the Pimsleur Approach) continued to produce level’s 2 & 3 for Tagalog and did not stop at LEVEL 1. For Portuguese, I used the Teach yourself series and was able to achieve my goals. In fact, my communication with native speakers while in Brazil seemed second nature and I didn’t even finish the course book yet. Well, Teach yourself Tagalog is a whole different story! You see…. Each Teach Yourself book is written by different authors who have personal approaches towards the language that is being introduced & covered within the course book. The Teach Yourself Tagalog book falls short when it comes to translations of the dialogues….. hence, which is a problem. So my approach wasn’t working well as it did for Portuguese and I had to find a solution. What’s the solution you ask? Well, a different method in using the book. The answer? F – L – R I’ve been a long time subscriber of Laoshu505000 a friend of mine on YouTube and after discussing this unique method of his with him, I was able to dissect the dialogues of Unit 1-5 for key terms without a problem and have built a collection of example phrases which are useful when speaking for the first time. I am currently using this method along with Luca’s (a friend on YouTube as well) re-translation technique in order to gain a higher level of knowledge in Tagalog in a short amount of time. Both are going good and I hope to someday find a technique which works best for me. Tagalog pronunciation is not that bad for native speakers of English so after getting use to the pronunciation of the “ng” connectors (first word ending with a vowel), everything else should be easy. Well that’s all for now, I’ve posted pictures of the two books that I’m using for Tagalog now. A grammar book and a course book. TEACH YOURSELF TAGALOG – COURSE BOOK BASIC TAGALOG – GRAMMAR BOOK As I can remember, I started dabbling with Tagalog (language of the Philippines) during July of last year 2009. Before then, I was actively studying Portuguese and still continue to look over notes that I’ve created during study hours.